Tag Archives: Amikacin

Therapy For Specific Diseases Of The External Ear Canal

Ectoparasites Thorough cleaning of the external ear canal, treatment of all household pets, and whole-body therapy should be considered in the treatment regimen for ear mites. Pets with no clinical signs may be asymptomatic carriers and a reservoir for reinfestation. Otic parasiticides such as pyrethrins, rotenone, amitraz, and carbaryl must be administered every 24 hours… Read More »

Diseases Of The Middle And Inner Ear

Normal Anatomy and Physiology The middle ear consists of the tympanic membrane, three cavities (epitympanic, tympanic, and ventral), and the bony ossicles (malleus, incus, and stapes). The tympanic membrane has two parts: (1) the thin pars tensa that attaches to the manubrium of the malleus and (2), above the pars tensa, the thicker, pars flaccida.… Read More »

Amphotericin B Desoxycholate, Amphotericin B Lipid-Based (Abelcet, Fungizone)

Antifungal Highlights Of Prescribing Information • Systemic antifungal used for serious mycotic infections • Must be administered IV • Nephrotoxicity is biggest concern, particularly with the deoxycholate form; newer lipid based products are less nephrotoxic & penetrate into tissues better, but are more expensive • Renal function monitoring essential • Amphotericin B Desoxycholate, Amphotericin B… Read More »

Aminophylline Theophylline

Phosphodiesterase Inhibitor Bronchodilator Highlights Of Prescribing Information • Bronchodilator drug with diuretic activity; used for bronchospasm & cardiogenic pulmonary edema • Narrow therapeutic index in humans, but dogs appear to be less susceptible to toxic effects at higher plasma levels • Therapeutic drug monitoring recommended • Many drug interactions What Is Aminophylline Theophylline Used For?… Read More »

Amikacin Sulfate (Amikin, Amiglyde-V)

Aminoglycoside Antibiotic Highlights Of Prescribing Information • Parenteral aminoglycoside antibiotic that has good activity against a variety of bacteria, predominantly gram-negative aerobic bacilli • Adverse Effects: Nephrotoxicity, ototoxicity, neuromuscu-lar blockade • Cats may be more sensitive to toxic effects • Risk factors for toxicity: Preexisting renal disease, age (both neonatal & geriatric), fever, sepsis &… Read More »

Infective Endocarditis

Infective endocarditis (IE) is a life-threatening disorder that results from microorganisms that colonize the cardiac endocardium, which commonly causes destruction of valves or other structures within the heart. Bacteremia is by far the most common etiology, with the mitral and aortic valve most frequently affected. Vegetation may cause thromboembolism or metastatic infections, which involve multiple… Read More »

Treatment of RFM

Although many mares with RFM do not become clinically ill, early prophylactic intervention is widely practiced because the complications associated with RFM may be severe and potentially life threatening. Many farm managers and horse owners with a veterinary client-patient relationship may be instructed to begin intramuscular (IM) injections of oxytocin 2 to 4 hours postpartum… Read More »

General Considerations For Testing Ability Of Spermatozoa To Survive Cooled Storage

Preservation of semen begins with the collection process. Accurate assessment of semen quality relies heavily on proper semen collection techniques. Ejaculated semen is susceptible to environmental influences. Therefore mishandling semen samples before evaluation can lead to erroneous interpretation of results, thereby negating their value for representing the ability of a stallion’s spermatozoa to survive the… Read More »

Endometrial Culture and Antimicrobial Therapy

Sampling of the surface of the endometrium for pathogenic microflora is an important part of the breeding soundness evaluation of the mare. Additionally, most breeding sheds and stallion owners require broodmares to have a negative uterine culture before natural mating. Breeds that allow artificial insemination may be less restrictive with this requirement. Other indications for… Read More »

Canine Parvovirus

1. What are the common clinical signs in dogs with canine parvovirus (CPV)? • Lethargy • Vomiting • Inappetence • Fever • Acute-onset diarrhea • Profound neutropenia (white blood cells < 1000/mm3) Puppies between the ages of 6 weeks to 6 months are most commonly affected. In a Canadian study, sexually intact dogs had a… Read More »