Tag Archives: Aspirin

Dilated cardiomyopathy in the cat

The aetiology of primary dilated cardiomyopathy in the cat is unknown. Recent work has indicated a close association between dietary taurine deficiency and dilated cardiomyopathy. In the cat, taurine is an essential amino acid which is required for the conjugation of bile acids. The premise that taurine deficiency is one of the causative factors in… Read More »

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the cat

The incidence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is higher in the cat than it is in the dog. hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can be classified as primary or secondary. The aetiology of the primary or idiopathic form is unknown. A recent survey of 74 cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy showed no apparent breed predilection ; others have suggested that… Read More »

Arterial thromboembolism in the cat

Cats with any form of cardiomyopathy have a predilection to form intracardiac thrombi in the left atrium; the incidence is highest in cats with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. These thrombi often become lodged at the bifurcation of the iliac arteries; less frequently they may occlude the brachia!, coeliac or renal arteries. Pathophysiology Altered blood flow and vascular… Read More »

Dirofilariasis

Canine heart worm disease caused by Dirofilaria immitis is endemic in most temperate and tropical coastal zones of the world (United States. Japan and Australia especially). Heartworm disease is occasionally diagnosed in imported dogs in the United Kingdom. Affected animals are often between 4 and 7 years of age although the condition has been diagnosed… Read More »

Cor pulmonale

Cor pulmonale is the term used to describe the alterations in the structure or function of the right ventricle which may be induced by pulmonary hypertension secondary to primary lung disease. Pathophystology of cor pulmonale Cor pulmonale may be acute or chronic. Alveolar hypoxia and hypoxaemia, respiratory acidosis and hypercapnoea combine to increase pulmonary vascular… Read More »

Tetralogy of Fallot

The four components of tetralogy of Fallot are (1) pulmonic stenosis (valvular, infundibular or both), (2) high ventricular septai defect, (3) compensatory right ventricular hypertrophy (secondary to pulmonic stenosis) and (4) an overriding or dextraposed aorta which means the aorta may arise from both ventricles or from the right ventricle alone. Pathophysiology The haemodynamic abnormalities… Read More »

Positive inotropic agents

An ideal positive inotropic agent should increase the force of contraction of cardiac muscle at a given degree of end-diastolic stretch without reducing efficiency of energy use, increasing the heart rate or predisposing to cardiac arrhythmias. The drug should also lack vasoconstrictor action on peripheral blood vessels. Drugs which enhance myocardial intracellular cyclic AMP concentration… Read More »

Therapy Of Thromboembolic Disease

The management of primary diseases resulting in the development of thromboembolism is discussed in related posts throughout this textbook. Therapy of thromboembolism should be directed toward the underlying disorder whenever possible. Therapeutic strategies for managing thromboembolism include short-term systemic anticoagulation and fibrinolysis followed by long-term antiplatelet or anticoagulant therapy to reduce the risk of rethrombosis.… Read More »

Treatment And Prevention of Feline Heartworm Disease

The question arises as to whether heartworm prophylaxis is warranted for cats because they are not the natural host and because the incidence is low. Necropsy studies of feline heartworm infection in the Southeast have yielded a prevalence of 2.5% to 14%, with a median of 7%. When considering the question of institution of prophylaxis,… Read More »

Canine Heartworm Disease: Ancillary Therapy

Corticosteroids The anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects inherent to corticosteroids are useful for treatment of some aspects of HWD. Prednisone, the steroid most often advocated, reduces pulmonary arteritis but actually worsens the proliferative vascular lesions of HWD, diminishes pulmonary arterial flow, and reduces the effectiveness of thiacetarsemide. For these reasons, corticosteroids are indicated in heartworm disease… Read More »