Tag Archives: Chlorhexidine

Urine Collection Techniques

Urine can be removed from the bladder by one of four methods: (1) voided (the “free catch”), (2) manual compression of the urinary bladder (expressing the bladder), (3) catheterization, or (4) cystocentesis. Voiding For routine urinalysis, collection of urine by voiding (micturition) is satisfactory. The major disadvantage is risk of contamination of the sample with… Read More »

Diseases of the Ear: General Principles Of Management

The therapeutic plan for otitis externa requires identification of the primary disease process and perpetuating factors. Ideally management is aimed at thoroughly cleaning and drying the ear canal, removing or managing the primary factors, controlling perpetuating factors, administering appropriate topical or systemic therapy (or both), and evaluating response to therapy. Ear Cleaning Ear cleaning serves… Read More »

Therapy For Specific Diseases Of The External Ear Canal

Ectoparasites Thorough cleaning of the external ear canal, treatment of all household pets, and whole-body therapy should be considered in the treatment regimen for ear mites. Pets with no clinical signs may be asymptomatic carriers and a reservoir for reinfestation. Otic parasiticides such as pyrethrins, rotenone, amitraz, and carbaryl must be administered every 24 hours… Read More »

Diseases Of The Middle And Inner Ear

Normal Anatomy and Physiology The middle ear consists of the tympanic membrane, three cavities (epitympanic, tympanic, and ventral), and the bony ossicles (malleus, incus, and stapes). The tympanic membrane has two parts: (1) the thin pars tensa that attaches to the manubrium of the malleus and (2), above the pars tensa, the thicker, pars flaccida.… Read More »

Postanesthetic Upper Respiratory Tract Obstruction

Upper respiratory tract () obstruction can occur in horses recovering from general anesthesia after various surgical procedures. Postanesthetic upper respiratory tract obstruction most often results from nasal edema and/or congestion and is usually mild. Other causes include arytenoid chondritis, dorsal displacement of the soft palate, and bilateral arytenoid cartilage paralysis. Bilateral arytenoid cartilage paralysis is… Read More »

Normal Peripartum Procedures

The expected foaling date should be calculated as 11 months and 5 days. At approximately 30 days before foaling, booster vaccines should be given and the mare should be dewormed. If fescue toxicosis is problematic in the area, foaling mares should not be allowed to graze fescue pasture and should not be fed hay-containing fescue… Read More »

Complications Of Burns

Infection is a serious and frequent complication of burns and must be addressed at an early stage. For the most part, normal skin commensal organisms such as Streptococcus equi var. zooepidemicus, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa are encountered with some complicated by other gram-negative species, such as E. coli and Clostridia spp., and yeasts can… Read More »

Sporotrichosis

Sporotrichosis: Etiology Sporotrichosis is a mycotic disease caused by the dimorphic fungus Sporothrix schenckii. S. schenckii exists in a mycelial form at environmental temperatures (25°-30° C) and as a yeast form in body tissues (37° C). The organism is distributed worldwide and can be found preferentially in soils that are rich in decaying organic matter.… Read More »

Treatment of Pastern Dermatitis

The appropriate therapy obviously involves identification of the predisposing, perpetuating, and primary factors. In general, avoiding pastures/paddocks with mud, water, or sand may minimize predisposing factors. Keeping patients stalled during wet weather and until morning dew has dried is often rewarding. Use of alternate sources of bedding may be beneficial because the chemicals in treated… Read More »