Tag Archives: Detomidine

Permanent Tracheostomy in Standing Horses

Diseases of the upper airway such as laryngeal hemiplegia, arytenoid chondritis, subepiglottic cysts, aryepiglottic fold entrapment, and dorsal displacement of the soft palate are commonly encountered in horses. In all of these conditions some abnormality of the upper airway compromises the cross-sectional area of the airway and causes decreased airflow; the condition usually becomes clinically… Read More »

Stallion Behavior Problems

This post briefly outlines several of the most common behavior problems of breeding stallions. These problems include self-mutilation, inadequate libido, rowdy breeding behavior, specific erection dysfunction, mounting and thrusting difficulties, frenzied hyperactive behavior, and specific ejaculation dysfunction. Also briefly outlined is the common problem of residual stallionlike behavior in geldings. Inadequate Libido Specific stallion libido… Read More »

Oocyte Transfer

Oocyte transfer is the placement of a donor’s oocyte into the oviduct of a recipient. The recipient can be inseminated within the uterus or within the oviduct. Placement of the oocyte and sperm within the recipient’s oviduct is more accurately termed gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT). The first successful oocyte transfer was done in 1989; however,… Read More »

Aspects Of Chemical Restraint

Chemical restraint is often necessary in reptile medicine to facilitate procedures from simply extracting the head of a leopard tortoise or box turtle, to enable a jugular blood sample to be performed, to coeliotomy procedures such as surgical correction of egg-binding. Before any anesthetic / sedative is administered, an assessment of the reptile patient’s health… Read More »

Induction of Anesthesia

Injectable agents Advantages of injectable anesthetics include ease of administration, avoiding problems related to breath-holding and prolonged induction, low cost and good availability. Disadvantages include a recovery often dependent on organ metabolism, difficulty reversing medications in emergency situations, prolonged recovery periods and necrosis of muscle cells at injection sites. Also, due to the renal portal… Read More »

Avian Anesthesia: Induction of anesthesia

Injectable agents The advantages of injectable anesthetics include ease of administration, rapid induction, low cost and availability. Disadvantages include the fact that recovery is often dependent on organ metabolism, potentially difficult reversal of medications in emergency situations, prolonged and sometimes traumatic recovery periods, muscle necrosis at injection sites and lack of adequate muscle relaxation with… Read More »

Induction And Maintenance Of Anesthesia

Injectable agents The advantages of the injectable anesthetics are that they are often easy to administer, they frequently involve minimal stress and they prevent the problems encountered with breath-holding when using gaseous induction techniques. Disadvantages include the problem of reversal for some agents, the often varying responses depending on the individual animal and the frequent… Read More »

Premedication Or Sedation

Premedication is widely used prior to general anaesthesia, with the agent(s) chosen affecting the whole course of subsequent events. The aims of premedication can be summarised: (1) To calm the patient: This reduces stress, not only for the animal, but also for the anaesthetist. A patient struggling at induction will have high circulating levels of… Read More »