Tag Archives: Diazepam

Ventricular arrhythmias

Site shows some of the common clinical situations associated with ventricular arrhythmias. As can be seen, many cardiac and extracardiac conditions which compromise oxygen supply to cardiac muscle leading to ischaemia, or which increase sympathetic stimulation to the heart or generate factors which are toxic to the myocardium, commonly give rise to ventricular arrhythmias. If… Read More »

Drugs used to treat ventricular arrhythmias

The drugs used most commonly in veterinary practice to treat ventricular arrhythmias are the Class I drugs (local anaesthetic agents) and the Class II drugs (beta-adrenoceptor antagonists). Site shows the ways in which these drugs interfere with the pathological mechanisms involved in arrhythmogenesis. Since the mechanisms involved in the generation of most ventricular arrhythmias cannot… Read More »

Urine Collection Techniques

Urine can be removed from the bladder by one of four methods: (1) voided (the “free catch”), (2) manual compression of the urinary bladder (expressing the bladder), (3) catheterization, or (4) cystocentesis. Voiding For routine urinalysis, collection of urine by voiding (micturition) is satisfactory. The major disadvantage is risk of contamination of the sample with… Read More »

Aminophylline Theophylline

Phosphodiesterase Inhibitor Bronchodilator Highlights Of Prescribing Information • Bronchodilator drug with diuretic activity; used for bronchospasm & cardiogenic pulmonary edema • Narrow therapeutic index in humans, but dogs appear to be less susceptible to toxic effects at higher plasma levels • Therapeutic drug monitoring recommended • Many drug interactions What Is Aminophylline Theophylline Used For?… Read More »

Alprazolam (Xanax)

Benzodiazepine Sedative / Tranquilizer Highlights Of Prescribing Information • Oral benzodiazepine that may be useful for unwanted behaviors in dogs or cats • Contraindications: Aggressive animals (controversial), benzodiazepine hypersensitivity • Caution: Hepatic or renal disease • Adverse Effects: Sedation, behavior changes, & contradictory responses; physical dependence is a possibility; may impede training • C-IV controlled… Read More »

Acepromazine Maleate (PromAce, Aceproject)

Phenothiazine Sedative / Tranquilizer Highlights Of Prescribing Information • Negligible analgesic effects • Dosage may need to be reduced in debilitated or geriatric animals, those with hepatic or cardiac disease, or when combined with other agents • Inject IV slowly; do not inject into arteries • Certain dog breeds (e.g., giant breeds, sight hounds) may… Read More »

Stallion Behavior Problems

This post briefly outlines several of the most common behavior problems of breeding stallions. These problems include self-mutilation, inadequate libido, rowdy breeding behavior, specific erection dysfunction, mounting and thrusting difficulties, frenzied hyperactive behavior, and specific ejaculation dysfunction. Also briefly outlined is the common problem of residual stallionlike behavior in geldings. Inadequate Libido Specific stallion libido… Read More »

Neurological Conditions

Afghan myelopathy A progressive disease of the white matter of the spinal cord. Symptoms include pelvic limb ataxia and paresis progressing to thoracic limb involvement, tetraplegia and eventually death from respiratory paralysis. Ambylopia and quadriplegia This is a lethal inherited condition of Irish Setters. Puppies are unable to walk and progression to visual impairment, nystagmus… Read More »

Aspects Of Chemical Restraint

Chemical restraint is often necessary in reptile medicine to facilitate procedures from simply extracting the head of a leopard tortoise or box turtle, to enable a jugular blood sample to be performed, to coeliotomy procedures such as surgical correction of egg-binding. Before any anesthetic / sedative is administered, an assessment of the reptile patient’s health… Read More »

Hepatic Lipidosis And Acute Hepatitis

1. What is hepatic lipidosis? Hepatic lipidosis is a common disease of cats in which excessive fat accumulates in hepatocytes and may lead to severe intrahepatic cholestasis and progressive liver failure. Most cases in cats are idiopathic. Diabetes mellitus, pancreatitis, cholangiohepatitis, hyperthyroidism, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, renal disease, chronic cystitis, chronic upper respiratory infections, hyperadrenocorticism, and neoplasia… Read More »