Tag Archives: Digoxin

Dilated cardiomyopathy in the cat

The aetiology of primary dilated cardiomyopathy in the cat is unknown. Recent work has indicated a close association between dietary taurine deficiency and dilated cardiomyopathy. In the cat, taurine is an essential amino acid which is required for the conjugation of bile acids. The premise that taurine deficiency is one of the causative factors in… Read More »

Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in the cat

The incidence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is higher in the cat than it is in the dog. hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can be classified as primary or secondary. The aetiology of the primary or idiopathic form is unknown. A recent survey of 74 cases of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy showed no apparent breed predilection ; others have suggested that… Read More »

Positive inotropic agents

An ideal positive inotropic agent should increase the force of contraction of cardiac muscle at a given degree of end-diastolic stretch without reducing efficiency of energy use, increasing the heart rate or predisposing to cardiac arrhythmias. The drug should also lack vasoconstrictor action on peripheral blood vessels. Drugs which enhance myocardial intracellular cyclic AMP concentration… Read More »

Management Of Cardiac Arrhythmias

Abnormalities in the generation and / or the conduction of electrical impulses in the heart can give rise to an overall reduction in the heart rate (bradydysrhythmias) or a rapid heart rate (tachydysrhythinias). In both circumstances, cardiac function may be compromised. Slow rates (<50 bpm) lead to inadequate output despite a very large stroke volume… Read More »

Bradycardia

Symptomatic bradycardia results from problems of impulse generation in the sinus node and / or its conduction from the atria to the ventricles. Both of these processes are influenced by the autonomic nervous system with the parasympathetic system slowing and the sympathetic system accelerating impulse generation and conduction. Non-cardiac causes of bradycardia Sinus bradycardia is… Read More »

Supraventricutar tachydysrhythmias

Sinus tachycardia (heart rates greater than 160-180 bpm in the dog and 240 bpm in the cat respectively) can occur in response to pain> fright, fever, anaemia, circulatory shock and hyperthyroidism, all states where sympathetic tone to the heart increases and as a result, the rate of impulse generation and conduction is enhanced. Drugs such… Read More »

Canine Heartworm Disease: Complications And Specific Syndromes

Asymptomatic Heartworm Infection Most dogs with heartworm infection are asymptomatic, even though many of these have heartworm disease (radiographic and pathologic lesions). Treatment is as described previously, using melarsomine in the split-dose regimen, along with a macrolide preventative. Asymptomatic dogs may, however, become symptomatic af’er adulticidal therapy due to postadulticidal thromboembolization and lung injury (as… Read More »

Dilated Cardiomyopathy: Chronic Therapy

Diuretic Therapy Diuretics are the only drugs that can routinely control the clinical signs referable to congestion and edema due to heart failure. Consequently, it is mandatory for cats with congestive heart failure to be on a diuretic, usually furosemide. The chronic orally administered dose for furosemide in cats is wide and ranges from 0.5… Read More »

Arrhythmocenic Right Ventricular Cardiomyopathy

ARVC is a recendy reported and rare form of feline cardiomyopathy. It has been identified in humans, dogs (boxer dogs), and cats. It is characterized by fibrofatty or fatty infiltration of primarily the right ventricular free wall. The right ventricular wall is commonly thinned in humans and cats with the disease. Ventricular tachyarrhythmias are common… Read More »

Management of Chronic Mitral Valve Insufficiency

Ideally, therapy of chronic mitral valve insufficiency would halt the progression of the valvular degeneration. Improvement of valvular function by surgical repair or valve replacement would likewise stop further deterioration. However, no therapy is currently known to inhibit or prevent the valvular degeneration, and surgery is usually not technically, economically, or ethically possible in canine… Read More »