Tag Archives: Flunixin meglumine

Interstitial Pneumonia

Interstitial pneumonia is an uncommon cause of acute or chronic disorders of the lower respiratory tract of horses. However, because of the severity of the process, recognition and definitive diagnosis of this entity are important as early as possible in its clinical course. The term interstitial pneumonia defines a number of diseases that are chronic… Read More »

Pleuropneumonia

Thoracic Ultrasonography Thoracic ultrasonography currently is regarded as the preferred method to diagnose pleuropneumonia in the horse. Although the value of the art of thoracic auscultation and percussion should not be undermined, clinicians managing horses with thoracic disease recognize the limitations of these tools. With the widespread use of thoracic ultrasound, the equine practitioner currently… Read More »

Permanent Tracheostomy in Standing Horses

Diseases of the upper airway such as laryngeal hemiplegia, arytenoid chondritis, subepiglottic cysts, aryepiglottic fold entrapment, and dorsal displacement of the soft palate are commonly encountered in horses. In all of these conditions some abnormality of the upper airway compromises the cross-sectional area of the airway and causes decreased airflow; the condition usually becomes clinically… Read More »

Postanesthetic Upper Respiratory Tract Obstruction

Upper respiratory tract () obstruction can occur in horses recovering from general anesthesia after various surgical procedures. Postanesthetic upper respiratory tract obstruction most often results from nasal edema and/or congestion and is usually mild. Other causes include arytenoid chondritis, dorsal displacement of the soft palate, and bilateral arytenoid cartilage paralysis. Bilateral arytenoid cartilage paralysis is… Read More »

Treatment of Vasculitis

Treatment of purpura hemorrhagica and similar idiopathic vasculitides consists of the following: (1) removing the antigenic stimulus; (2) suppressing the immune response; (3) reducing vessel wall inflammation; and (4) providing supportive care. Any drugs given when the clinical signs occurred should be discontinued, or, if continued medication is necessary, an alternate drug should be chosen… Read More »

Acquired Coagulation Disorders

Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Disseminated intravascular coagulation () is the most common hemostatic dysfunction in the horse. disseminated intravascular coagulation is an acquired process in which activation of coagulation causes widespread fibrin deposition in the microcirculation resulting in ischemic damage to tissues. Hemorrhagic diathesis occurs as a result of consumption of procoagulants or hyperactivity of fibrinolysis.… Read More »

Treatment of RFM

Although many mares with RFM do not become clinically ill, early prophylactic intervention is widely practiced because the complications associated with RFM may be severe and potentially life threatening. Many farm managers and horse owners with a veterinary client-patient relationship may be instructed to begin intramuscular (IM) injections of oxytocin 2 to 4 hours postpartum… Read More »

Algorithm For Emergency Treatment Of Hemorrhage In The Broodmare

A simplified, step-by-step, sample flow chart for hemorrhage treatment is outlined below. The clinician should keep in mind that this outline describes an attempt to treat what should be a surgical problem, medically. One can only surmise at the nature of the internal insult. Periodic evaluation of the mare without quantification of the severity of… Read More »

Placental Hydrops

Hydrops is a rare condition in the mare, with hydroallantois occurring more commonly than hydramnios. Hydroallantois causes rapid abdominal enlargement during the last trimester of pregnancy (), and a sudden increase in the volume of allantoic fluid during a period of 10 to 14 days. The pathophysiology of hydroallantois in the mare remains unknown. Some… Read More »

Placentitis

The equine placenta consists of the allantochorion, the allantoamnion, and the umbilical cord. The chorionic portion of the allantochorion is attached to the endometrium by microcotyledons that are present throughout the uterus, with the exception of a small area at the internal os of the cervix called the cervical star. The allantochorion supports the fetus… Read More »