Tag Archives: Phenothiazine

Amitriptyline HCL (Elavil)

Tricyclic Behavior Modifier; Anti-Pruritic; Neuropathic Pain Modifier Highlights Of Prescribing Information • Tricyclic “antidepressant” used primarily for behavior disorders & neuropathic pain/pruritus in small animals • May reduce seizure thresholds in epileptic animals • Sedation & anticholinergic effects most likely adverse effects • Overdoses can be very serious in both animals & humans What Is… Read More »

Aminophylline Theophylline

Phosphodiesterase Inhibitor Bronchodilator Highlights Of Prescribing Information • Bronchodilator drug with diuretic activity; used for bronchospasm & cardiogenic pulmonary edema • Narrow therapeutic index in humans, but dogs appear to be less susceptible to toxic effects at higher plasma levels • Therapeutic drug monitoring recommended • Many drug interactions What Is Aminophylline Theophylline Used For?… Read More »

Aminopentamide Hydrogen Sulfate (Centrine)

Anticholinergic/Antispasmodic Highlights Of Prescribing Information • Anticholinergic/antispasmodicfor GI indications in small animals • Typical adverse effect profile (“dry, hot, red”); potentially could cause tachycardia • Contraindicated in glaucoma; relatively contraindicated in tachycardias, heart disease, GI obstruction, etc. What Is Aminopentamide Hydrogen Sulfate Used For? The manufacturer states that the drug is indicated “in the treatment… Read More »

Acepromazine Maleate (PromAce, Aceproject)

Phenothiazine Sedative / Tranquilizer Highlights Of Prescribing Information • Negligible analgesic effects • Dosage may need to be reduced in debilitated or geriatric animals, those with hepatic or cardiac disease, or when combined with other agents • Inject IV slowly; do not inject into arteries • Certain dog breeds (e.g., giant breeds, sight hounds) may… Read More »

Hemolytic Anemia

Hemolytic anemia is a pathologic condition that results from accelerated erythrocyte removal and can be intravascular and extravascular. Intravascular hemolysis occurs when erythrocytes are destroyed within the vascular space. Clinical signs associated with intravascular hemolysis are typically acute in onset and classically include icterus and red- to port-wine-colored urine. Extravascular hemolysis results from accelerated erythrocyte… Read More »

Maternal And Foal Behavior And Problems

Normal Maternal-Foal Behavior Key aspects of normal equine maternal behavior include (1) attending to the foal within seconds after delivery, including nuzzling, licking, and vocalization, (2) avoiding walking or lying on the neonate, (3) allowing and facilitating nursing of own, but not other foals, and (4) protecting the neonate from intruders by positioning herself between… Read More »

Acepromazine

Acepromazine Maleate (Promace) Chemical Compound: 2-Acetyl-10-(3-dimethylaminopropyl) phenothiazine hydrogen maleate DEA Classification: Not a controlled substance Preparations: Generally available in 5-, 10-, 25-mg tablets and 10 mg/ml injectable forms Clinical Pharmacology Acepromazine is a low-potency phenothiazine neuroleptic agent that blocks postsynaptic dopamine receptors and increases the turnover rate of dopamine. Acepromazine has a depressant effect on… Read More »

Antipsychotics

Antipsychotics are used to treat most forms of psychosis, including schizophrenia, in humans. They do not have the same significance in animal behavior therapy and are usually most appropriately used on a short-term, intermittent basis. The first antipsychotic, chlorpromazine, was developed in 1950. Individual antipsychotic drugs show a wide range of physiological effects, resulting in… Read More »

Canine Parvovirus

1. What are the common clinical signs in dogs with canine parvovirus (CPV)? • Lethargy • Vomiting • Inappetence • Fever • Acute-onset diarrhea • Profound neutropenia (white blood cells < 1000/mm3) Puppies between the ages of 6 weeks to 6 months are most commonly affected. In a Canadian study, sexually intact dogs had a… Read More »

Constipation

Constipation; Cause The etiopathogenesis of idiopathic megacolon is still incompletely understood. Several reviews have emphasized the importance of considering an extensive list of differential diagnoses (e. g., neuromuscular, mechanical, inflammatory, metabolic and endocrine, pharmacologic, environmental, and behavioral causes) for the obstipated cat (Box Differential Diagnosis of Constipation in the Cat). A review of published cases… Read More »