Tag Archives: Triamcinolone

Diseases of the Ear: General Principles Of Management

The therapeutic plan for otitis externa requires identification of the primary disease process and perpetuating factors. Ideally management is aimed at thoroughly cleaning and drying the ear canal, removing or managing the primary factors, controlling perpetuating factors, administering appropriate topical or systemic therapy (or both), and evaluating response to therapy. Ear Cleaning Ear cleaning serves… Read More »

Heaves (Recurrent Airway Obstruction)

Practical Management of Acute Episodes and Prevention of Exacerbations Heaves, also known as recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), is an inflammatory condition in horses that results from the inhalation of dust in moldy hay and bedding. The condition affects primarily the small airways of horses and causes bronchospasm, bronchial hyperresponsiveness,… Read More »

Corticosteroids Recommended for the Treatment of Heaves

Corticosteroids are the most potent drugs currently available for the treatment of heaves (Table Medications Recommended for the Treatment of Heaves). The mechanisms of action of corticosteroids include decreasing smooth muscle contraction and epithelial damage by inhibiting the effects of inflammatory cells and their mediators, potentiation of the bronchodilating effects of catecholamines and reduction of… Read More »

Treatment of Cutaneous Lymphosarcoma

Glucocorticoids remain the mainstay of treatment of cutaneous T cell-rich, B cell lymphoma. Tumor regression is typically noted following the systemic administration of dexamethasone (0.02-0.2 mg/kg IV, IM or PO q24h) or prednisolone (1-2 mg/kg PO q24h). In these authors’ experience, dexamethasone proves more effective than prednisolone in treating lymphosarcoma. Once cutaneous lesions have regressed… Read More »

Collagenolytic Granuloma

The second clinical presentation of nodules is that of a more slowly progressive, infiltrative lesion. Collagenolytic granuloma (nodular necrobiosis, equine eosinophilic granuloma with collagen degeneration) is the most common nodular skin disease of horses within this category. The etiology of these nodules is unknown; however, it is probably a type IV hypersensitivity reaction to insect… Read More »

Treatment of Cutaneous Habronemiasis

Antiinflammatory Drugs Because a hypersensitivity reaction to the larvae is believed to be one of the major causes in the pathogenesis of this skin disease, treatment usually involves some form of either topical or systemic steroid therapy. The most common steroids used in topical preparation are dexamethasone and triamcinolone. These steroids are most commonly combined… Read More »

Selected Acquired Diseases Of The Lips, Cheeks, And Palate

Feline eosinophilic granuloma complex (FEGC) comprises an eosinophilic ulcer, plaque, and a linear granuloma. Oral lesions are usually a linear granuloma or an eosinophilic ulcer; the latter has a predisposition for the maxillary lips (80%). Intraoral lesions appear as one or more discrete, firm, raised nodules. Clinical signs include dysphagia and / or ptyalism. Although… Read More »

Corticosteroids

The anti-inflammatory effects of corticosteroids are based upon their ability to suppress capillary dilatation, vascular exudation, leucocyte migration, and immunosuppression regardless of the causative agent. In chronic conditions they inhibit neovascularisation and fibroblastic activity in the eye. This may be useful in preventing scarring and pigment deposition in the cornea but disadvantageous by retarding healing.… Read More »