Urine Collection Techniques

By | 2013-07-26

Urine can be removed from the bladder by one of four methods: (1) voided (the “free catch”), (2) manual compression of the urinary bladder (expressing the bladder), (3) catheterization, or (4) cystocentesis.

Voiding

For routine urinalysis, collection of urine by voiding (micturition) is satisfactory. The major disadvantage is risk of contamination of the sample with cells, bacteria, and other debris located in the genital tract and the perineal hair coat. The first portion of the stream is discarded, as it is most likely to contain debris. Voided urine samples are not recommended when bacterial cystitis is suspected.

Manual Compression of the Bladder

Compressing the urinary bladder is occasionally used to collect urine samples from dogs and cats. Critical: Do not use excessive pressure; if moderate digital pressure does not induce micturition, discontinue the technique. Excessive pressure can culminate in forcing contaminated urine (bladder) into the kidneys, or, worse, in patients with a urethral obstruction the urinary bladder can rupture. The technique is most difficult to accomplish in male dogs and male cats.

Urinary Catheterization

Several types of urinary catheters are currently available for use in dogs and cats. The catheter types most often used today are made of rubber, polypropylene, and latex-free silicone. Stainless steel catheters are occasionally used but unless placed with care these can cause damage to the urethra and/or urinary bladder. Generally, urinary catheters serve one of four purposes:

  1. 1. To relieve urinary retention
  2. 2. To test for residual urine
  3. 3. To obtain urine directly from the bladder for diagnostic purposes
  4. 4. To perform bladder lavage and instillation of medication or contrast material

The size of catheters (diameter) usually is calibrated in the French scale; each French unit is equivalent to roughly 0.33 mm. The openings adjacent to the catheter tips are called “eyes.” Human urethral catheters are used routinely in male and female dogs; 4F to 10F catheters are satisfactory for most dogs (Table Recommended Urethral Catheter Sizes for Routine Use in Dogs and Cats). Polypropylene catheters should be individually packaged and sterilized by ethylene oxide gas.

TABLE Recommended Urethral Catheter Sizes for Routine Use in Dogs and Cats

Animal Urethral Catheter Type Size (French Units*)
Cat Flexible vinyl, red rubber, or Tom Cat catheter (polyethylene) 3.5
Male dog (<25 lb) Flexible vinyl, red rubber, or polyethylene 3.5 or 5
Male dog (>25 lb) Flexible vinyl, red rubber, or polyethylene 8
Male dog (>75 lb) Flexible vinyl, red rubber, or polyethylene 10 or 12
Female dog (<10 lb)) Flexible vinyl, red rubber, or polyethylene 5
Female dog (10-50 lb) Flexible vinyl, red rubber, or polyethylene 8
Female dog (>50 lb) Flexible vinyl, red rubber, or polyethylene 10, 12, or 14

*The diameter of urinary catheters is measured on the French (F) scale. One French unit equals roughly 0.33 mm.

Catheterization of the Male Dog

Patient Preparation

Equipment needed to catheterize a male dog includes a sterile catheter (4F to 10F, 18 inches long, with one end adapted to fit a syringe), sterile lubricating jelly, povidone-iodine soap or chlorhexidine, sterile rubber gloves or a sterile hemostat, a 20-mL sterile syringe, and an appropriate receptacle for the collection of urine.

Proper catheterization of the male dog requires two persons. Place the dog in lateral recumbency on either side. Pull the rear leg that is on top forward, and then flex it (). Alternatively, long-legged dogs can be catheterized easily in a standing position.

Before catheter placement, retract the sheath of the penis and cleanse the glans penis with a solution of povidone-iodine 1% or chlorhexidine. Lubricate the distal 2 to 3 cm of the appropriate-size catheter with sterile lubricating jelly. Never entirely remove the catheter from its container while it is being passed because the container enables one to hold the catheter without contaminating it.

Technique

The catheter may be passed with sterile gloved hands or by using a sterile hemostat to grasp the catheter and pass it into the urethra. Alternatively, cut a 2-inch “butterfly” section from the end of the thin plastic catheter container. This section can be used as a cover for the sterile catheter, and the clinician can use the cover to grasp and advance the catheter without using gloves.

If the catheter cannot be passed into the bladder, the tip of the catheter may be caught in a mucosal fold of the urethra or there may be a stricture or block in the urethra. In small-breed dogs, the size of the groove in the os penis may limit the size of the catheter that can be passed. One also may experience difficulty in passing the catheter through the urethra where the urethra curves around the ischial arch. Occasionally a catheter of small diameter may kink and bend on being passed into the urethra. When the catheter cannot be passed on the first try, reevaluate the size of the catheter and gently rotate the catheter while passing it a second time. Never force the catheter through the urethral orifice.

Special Considerations

Effective catheterization is indicated by the flow of urine at the end of the catheter, and a sterile 20-mL syringe is used to aspirate the urine from the bladder. Walk the dog immediately after catheterization to encourage urination.

Catheterization of the Female Dog

Patient Preparation

Equipment needed to catheterize a female dog includes flexible urethral catheters identical to those used in the male dog. The following materials also should be on hand: a small nasal speculum, a 20-mL sterile syringe, lidocaine 0.5%, sterile lubricating jelly, a focal source of light, appropriate receptacles for urine collection, and 5 mL of povidone-iodine or a dilute chlorhexidine solution.

Use strict asepsis. Cleanse the vulva with a solution of povidone-iodine or dilute chlorhexidine. Instillation of lidocaine 0.5% into the vaginal vault helps to relieve the discomfort of catheterization. The external urethral orifice is 3 to 5 cm cranial to the ventral commissure of the vulva. In many instances the female dog may be catheterized in the standing position by passing the female catheter into the vaginal vault, despite the fact that the urethral papilla is not visualized directly.

Technique

In the spayed female dog, in which blind catheterization may be difficult, the use of a sterilized otoscope speculum andlight source (), vaginal speculum, or anal speculum with a light source will help to visualize the urethral tubercle on the floor of the vagina. In difficult catheterizations it may be helpful to place the animal in dorsal recumbency (). Insertion of a speculum into the vagina almost always permits visualization of the urethral papilla and facilitates passage of the catheter. Take care to avoid attempts to pass the catheter into the fossa of the clitoris because this is a blind, possibly contaminated cul-de-sac.

Catheterization of the Male Cat

Patient Preparation

Before attempting urinary bladder catheterization of the male cat, administer a short-term anesthetic (e.g., ketamine, 25 mg/kg IM), but only after a careful assessment of the cats physical, acid-base, and electrolyte status (see treatment of hyperkalemia).

In some cases, drugs to treat hyperkalemia may be required before anesthetic induction. Once the patient’s electrolyte status has been evaluated and hyperkalemia, if present, addressed appropriately, anesthesia can be induced with a combination of propofol (4 to 7 mg/kg intravenously [IV]) and diazepam (0.1 mg/kg IV); then the patient is intubated and maintained on gas anesthesia.

Technique

Place the anesthetized patient in dorsal recumbency. Gently grasp the ventral aspect of the prepuce and move it caudally in such a manner that the penis is extruded. Withdraw the penis from the sheath and gently pull the penis backward. Keeping sterile catheters in a freezer will help them become more rigid to facilitate passage into the urethra. Pass a sterile, flexible plastic or polyethylene (PE 60 to 90) catheter or 3- to 5-inch, 3.5F urethral catheter into the urethral orifice and gently into the bladder, keeping the catheter parallel to the vertebral column of the cat.

Caution: Never force the catheter through the urethra. The presence of debris within the urethral lumen may require the injection of 3 to 5 mL of sterile saline to back-flush urinary “sand” or concretions so that the catheter can be passed. In some instances the presence of cystic and urethral calculi will prevent the passage of a catheter into the urethra. For this reason a lateral radiograph of the penis, with the patients hindlimbs pulled caudally, may help document the presence of a urethral stone.

Catheterization of the Female Cat

Patient Preparation

Urinary bladder catheterization of the female cat is not a simple procedure. When indicated, and after a preanesthetic examination has been performed, attempt the technique only in the anesthetized cat. Urinary bladder catheterization can be accomplished with the use of a rubber or plastic, side-hole (blunt-ended) urinary catheter. The same catheter type used in male cats is effective in female cats. Instilling lidocaine 0.5% has been recommended as a means of decreasing sensitivity to catheter insertion in sedated (not recommended) cats. Cleanse the vulva with an appropriate antiseptic.

Technique

Catheterization can be accomplished with the cat in dorsal or ventral recumbency.

Experience and size of the cat dictate which technique works best.

After cleansing of the perineum and vaginal vault, place the patient in sternal recumbency, and gently pass the catheter along the ventral floor of the vaginal vault. Conversely, if the patient is placed in dorsal recumbency, direct the catheter dorsally along the ventral vaginal floor. If a catheter cannot be placed blindly, a small otoscopic speculum can be placed into the vagina, and the catheter pushed into the urethral papilla once it is visualized directly.

Indwelling Urethral Catheter

Patient Preparation

For continuous urine drainage in the awake, ambulatory patient, use a closed collection system to help prevent urinary tract infection. A soft urethral or Foley catheter can be used, and polyvinyl chloride tubing should be connected to the catheter and to the collection bag outside the cage. The collection bag should be below the level of the animal’s urinary bladder. Place an Elizabethan collar on the animal to discourage chewing on the catheter and associated tubing.

Technique

The urinary bladder is catheterized as described previously. Despite the quality of care of the catheter, urinary tract infection still may develop in any patient fitted with an indwelling urinary catheter. Ideally, remove the catheter as soon as it is no longer necessary, or if there are clinical signs of a urinary tract infection or previously undiagnosed fever. A urinary catheter is generally changed after it has been in place for more than 48 hours.

Special Considerations

Observe the patient for development of fever, discomfort, pyuria, or other evidence of urinary tract infection. If infection is suspected, remove the catheter and submit urine for culture and sensitivity or determination of minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Previously, culture of the catheter tip was recommended to diagnose a catheter-induced infection. However, culture of the catheter tip is no longer recommended, as it may not accurately reflect the type of microorganisms in a urinary tract infection. The empiric use of antibiotics to help prevent catheter-induced infection is not recommended, as their use can allow colonization of resistant nosocomial bacteria in the patient’s urinary tract.

Cystocentesis

Patient Preparation

Cystocentesis is a common clinical technique used to obtain a sample of urine directly from the urinary bladder of dogs and cats when collecting a voided, or free-catch, aliquot is not preferred. The procedure is indicated when necessary to obtain bladder urine for culture purposes. Urine that is collected by free catch has passed through the urethra and may be contaminated with bacteria, thereby making interpretation of the culture results difficult. Cystocentesis also is performed as a convenience when it is desirable to obtain a small sample of urine but the patient is not ready or cooperative.

Cystocentesis involves insertion of a needle, with a 6- or 12-mL syringe attached, through the abdominal wall and bladder wall to obtain urine samples for urinalysis or bacterial culture. The technique prevents contamination of urine by urethra, genital tract, or skin and reduces the risk of obtaining a contaminated sample. Cystocentesis also may be needed to decompress a severely overdistended bladder temporarily in an animal with urethral obstruction. In these cases, cystocentesis should be performed only if urethral catheterization is impossible. Warning: Penetration of a distended (obstructed) urinary bladder with a needle could result in rupture of the bladder.

Technique

To perform cystocentesis, palpate the ventral abdomen just cranial to the junction of the bladder with the urethra, and trap the urinary bladder between the fingers and the palm of the hand. Use one hand to hold the bladder steady within the peritoneal cavity while the other guides the needle. Next, insert the needle through the ventral abdominal wall into the bladder at a 45-degree angle (). Although this procedure is relatively safe, the bladder must have a reasonable volume of urine, and the procedure should not be performed without first identifying and immobilizing the bladder. For the procedure to be performed safely and quickly, the patient must be cooperative. If collection of a urine sample by cystocentesis is absolutely necessary, sedation may be indicated to restrain the patient adequately for the procedure.

Special Considerations

Generally, cystocentesis is a safe procedure, assuming the patient is cooperative and the bladder can be identified and stabilized throughout the procedure. However, injury and adverse reactions can occur. In addition to laceration of the bladder with the inserted needle (patient moves abruptly), the needle can be passed completely through the bladder and into the colon, causing bacterial contamination of the bladder or peritoneal cavity. There is also risk of penetrating a major abdominal bloodvessel, resulting in significant hemorrhage.